Trump Crushes TPP Wet Dream

by Zack Anderson, November 15, 2016

15 Responses to Trump Crushes TPP Wet Dream

  1. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 15, 2016 at 2:44 pm

    Bad news for the 6 Pacific Rim states.

  2. LouisBedrock Reply

    November 15, 2016 at 3:33 pm

    Good news for working people, environmentalists, and those who oppose the corporate agenda.

  3. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 15, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    Not good news for the hundreds of thousands people whose jobs depend upon the trade from TTP and not for environmentalists. You and Zack do not seem to understand what trade is now involved in the Pacific Rim.

  4. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 15, 2016 at 8:07 pm

    Louis and Zack; let’s take a step forward and discuss NAFTA which trump has some thoughts about. Is it also a ‘wet dream’?

  5. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 15, 2016 at 8:49 pm

    Oh yes, if the US doesn’t approved TPP the other countries no doubt will go forward with their RCEP which excludes the U. S. and where does that leave the U. S.?

  6. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 2:46 pm

    ?? no response from Louis or Zack – Your honor, I rest my case.

  7. Zack Anderson Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 3:05 pm

  8. BB Grace Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 3:10 pm

    I’ll respond Mr. Updegraff,

    China was not part of the TPP agreements though all of the states involved were but China, so now China will now take the lead.
    http://english.cctv.com/2016/11/17/VIDEzCjncdn4raLGyb5aqhrG161117.shtml

  9. LouisBedrock Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 3:19 pm

    Jim,

    Your ignorance on what these mislabeled”trade agreements” wreck on the working people in affected countries–Mexico, Canada, Puerto Rico, The U.S., is appalling.

    These are not trade agreements; they are tariff agreements that allow U.S. to ship surplus corn–GMO corn, to be sold in Mexico at a lower price than corn grown in Mexico, because the American corn is subsidized. Mexican farmers are driven out of business. As have been farmers in Haiti and Puerto Rico for similar reasons.

    NAFTA and GATT allow corporations to export jobs to lovely places where there are no unions, child labor laws, or environmental laws; no OSHA–where workers are paid cooly wages for 15 hour work days and work seven days a week–and the corporations bring back the manufactured goods into the U.S. without paying tariffs.

    When union contracts need to be renewed, corporate CEOS and XOs can basically say to workers in the U.S.: “Take it or leave it. And if you leave it, we move to Korea; or Indonesia; or The Philippines.

    Agreements like NAFTA and TPP also set up arbitration systems that bypass the legal systems of the participating treaty signers. A panel of corporate lawyers can allow U.S. insurance companies to sue countries like England, France, or Canada which have national health care systems for depriving these companies of profits.

    Did you hear about the Canadian farmer who was sued by Monsanto after his non-GMO corn was contaminated by GMO pollen? Monsanto put him out of business winning a multi-million dollar settlement against him. And this will increase exponentially if new trade deals like the TPP are approved.

    I like you and respect you, but I can’t argue with someone who doesn’t know what he’s talking about because he does’t do his homework.

  10. LouisBedrock Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 3:45 pm

    Jim,

    Here’s some bedtime reading by Public Citizen on NAFTA.

    http://www.citizen.org/documents/NAFTA-at-20.pdf

    Let me know what you dispute.

    LB

  11. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 8:16 pm

    That issue about the GMO law suit against the Canadian farmer has has also happened several times to American farmers.
    The sales to Mexico I was talking about wasn’t about corm it was about certain sophisticated auto electronic parts sold to Mexican auto assembly plants. Another concern is that of almond growers which sell up to 90% of their product overseas. That is just a couple of examples (don’t forget about our wine sales and sales of various computer companies) There are several agreements involved and I just loosely refer to them as “trade agreements”. Do you read about our recent agreement with Vietnam?

  12. Jim Updegraff Reply

    November 17, 2016 at 8:36 pm

    P. S. In 3014 CA exported agriculture products totaedl $21 billion whic account for 40% of output including besides the almonds and wine 28$ of Dairy output. As a sidebar it should be noted about 50% of ag workers are undocumented.

    • Harvey Reading Reply

      November 18, 2016 at 9:33 am

      Got nooze for ya. The figure of $21 billion, if from the CA Dept. of Finance, is probably bogus, and even if true, it is a drop in the bucket compared to a state domestic product that approaches $2 trillion. Big ag likes to inflate its importance and wants us all to believe that California feeds the world, which it doesn’t and never has. How many of those exported ‘products’ were made from cereal grains, almost all of which, including rice, are grown outside CA. The welfare farmers and ranchers have been playing this brainwashing game for many decades, and Jerry Brown (and most other past guvners as well) does nothing but encourage them in their misinformation campaign.

      • Harvey Reading Reply

        November 18, 2016 at 11:22 am

        Not to mention that the infrastructure for impounding water and delivering it to the welfare queens was paid for by general taxpayers, of the nation (Central Valley Project) and of the state (State Water Project). These same general taxpayers foot the cost for maintenance, and much of the cost for delivery of the water made available to these welfare queens, meaning that welfare ag gets a huge break on the delivered price of the water that other people largely paid for. And that has been true from the beginning. If the welfare ag users were to pay what that water actually cost, they would disappear.

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