Night of Terror, Days of Weird

by Zack Anderson, March 29, 2016

Yours in Haste and Adoration: The Selected Letters of the heroic Terry Southern.

http://www.oxfordamerican.org/magazine/item/784-nights-of-terror-days-of-weird

3 Responses to Night of Terror, Days of Weird

  1. Susie de Castro Reply

    March 29, 2016 at 3:50 pm

    “your patience and perseverance will ultimately win the day”, he wrote to the first lady (Hillary R. Clinton) in 1993.

  2. Zack Anderson Reply

    March 29, 2016 at 3:52 pm

    Disgusting to be sure. But he was probably drunk. Or needed the money. What’s Obama’s excuse?

  3. LouisBedrock Reply

    March 29, 2016 at 4:20 pm

    Zack,

    Forgive me for “mear fuera del tiesto”–your article was about Southern, not Clinton, but I feel obliged to introduce my two cents about the white witch–actually, John Pilger’s two cents:

    “A virulent if familiar censorship is about to descend on the U.S. election campaign. As the cartoon brute, Donald Trump, seems likely to win the Republican Party’s nomination, Hillary Clinton is being ordained both as the “women’s candidate” and the champion of American liberalism in its heroic struggle with the Evil One.

    This is drivel, of course; Hillary Clinton leaves a trail of blood and suffering around the world and a clear record of exploitation and greed in her own country. To say so, however, is becoming intolerable in the land of free speech.

    The danger … is not Trump, but Hillary Clinton. She is no maverick. She embodies the resilience and violence of a system whose vaunted “exceptionalism” is totalitarian with an occasional liberal face.
    As presidential Election Day draws near, Clinton will be hailed as the first female president, regardless of her crimes and lies – just as Barack Obama was lauded as the first black president and liberals swallowed his nonsense about “hope.” And the drool goes on.

    Described by the Guardian columnist Owen Jones as “funny, charming, with a coolness that eludes practically every other politician,” Obama the other day sent drones to slaughter 150 people in Somalia. He kills people usually on Tuesdays, according to the New York Times, when he is handed a list of candidates for death by drone. So cool.

    In the 2008 presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton threatened to “totally obliterate” Iran with nuclear weapons. As Secretary of State under Obama, she participated in the overthrow of the democratic government of Honduras. Her contribution to the destruction of Libya in 2011 was almost gleeful. When the Libyan leader, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, was publicly sodomized with a knife – a murder made possible by American logistics – Clinton gloated over his death: “We came, we saw, he died.”

    One of Clinton’s closest allies is Madeleine Albright, the former Secretary of State, who has attacked young women for not supporting “Hillary.” This is the same Madeleine Albright  who infamously celebrated on TV the death of half a million Iraqi children as “worth it”.

    Among Clinton’s biggest backers are the Israel lobby and the arms companies that fuel the violence in the Middle East. She and her husband have received a fortune from Wall Street. And yet, she is about to be ordained the women’s candidate, to see off the evil Trump, the official demon. Her supporters include distinguished feminists: the likes of Gloria Steinem in the U.S. and Anne Summers in Australia.

    A generation ago, a post-modern cult now known as “identity politics” stopped many intelligent, liberal-minded people examining the causes and individuals they supported — such as the fakery of Obama and Clinton; such as bogus progressive movements like Syriza in Greece, which betrayed the people of that country and allied with their enemies.

    Self-absorption, a kind of “me-ism,” became the new Zeitgeist in privileged Western societies and signaled the demise of great collective movements against war, social injustice, inequality, racism and sexism.

    What has happened to the great tradition of popular direct action, unfettered to parties? Where is the courage, the imagination and the commitment required to begin the long journey to a better, just and peaceful world? Where are the dissidents in art, film, the theatre, literature?

    Where are those who will shatter the silence? Or do we wait until the first nuclear missile is fired?

    (John Pilger)

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