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Mendocino County Today: Monday, March 3, 2014

by AVA News Service, March 3, 2014

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YOU’RE GETTING to be an old timer if you remember when Fjord’s was a buffet-style restaurant whose 60-foot sign looming up over North State Street announced the northern perimeter of Ukiah. The restaurant has been closed for years, but it and the sign are still there, relics of more optimistic times, today unsightly testaments to the impotence of local government that refused to abate the property.

Fjord's

IN A VIRTUAL SEA of eyesores on North State Street, Fjord’s rules. Cordoned off by a chain link fence that manages to make the depressing tableau even more dispiriting, it’s hard to believe anyone would actually offer to buy the site, listed for sale at $1.15 million.

BUT Todd Schapmire of Remax Realty, in full Micawber mode, told Tiffany Revelle of the Ukiah Daily Journal, “If it’s not the most prime commercial property in the county, it’s on the short list.”

THREE OUTSIDE SHARKS have sat on the property for years, claiming they were waiting for some sap to come along and sub-lease what is essentially a 4,700-foot shack. It would cost at least double the million-plus dollar asking price to make the building viable, a fact even its present lease holders admit doesn’t make Fjord’s a very good deal. The sharks who have given up seem to have the fanciful notion that a renter would come along and convert the place to the oasis it once was, having inflicted the site on the rest of us all these years. Maybe now that it’s for sale, we’ll eventually see an upgraded eyesore in the form of golden arches or the equivalent architectural imposition.

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I WAS PAUSED at the overlook at the edge of the Golden Gate, contemplating the fabulous history stretched somnolently out before me as if it were merely a stretch of water with a beautiful bridge across it. Or, then again, I might have been thinking of dinner. Or the Giants. But that place really does get this person out of the usual trivialities.

GGBOverlook

Two women approached me. “Excuse me,” the younger of the two said, “are you familiar with this area?” I said I was, and I am because it’s one of my favorite walks, although I doubt I could pass a docent’s test. “We want to see Sharon Stone’s house.” Whose house? “Sharon Stone’s house,” the girl replied as if a random Frisco old guy should not only know someone named Sharon Stone but know where she lived. “You know, Sharon Stone the movie star,” the girl clarified. Blonde vaguenesses occurred to me. “She lives out here somewhere,” the girl assured me. I knew for a fact Shar didn’t live next door to me in my furtive neighborhood of hurrying figures glimpsed only on garbage can day as they hustle their containers in and out of mysterious passageways. Sea Cliff maybe. If movie stars lived anywhere nearby it would be to our immediate west. By then, the subject had changed. “How do we get back to downtown?” the girl asked. Wandering around asking people where Sharon Stone lived didn’t seem like much of strategy. The older woman had hung back, letting the young one do all the talking, although to me mom would have been a more age-appropriate interlocutor. I steer clear of my fellow citizens in the 14-40 age range, although as a mathematical proposition I’m sure some of them are probably sentient beings. I told the girl and Silent Mom that their best bet for downtown would be to walk to the bridge and catch an inbound bus, the 28, I said, showing off my local guy insider-ness. “But we want to walk,” the girl said, as if I’d ordered her to take the bus. Neither one of them was togged out for long-haul pedestrianism. Both wore what I guess would be called dress shoes with heels, not high heels but certainly not walking heels. There’s no as-the-crow-flies route downtown from where we stood. I told them if they wanted to walk back to San Francisco’s beating heart, go back to the bridge, on down the hill to Crissy Field and just keep on footin’ it on the edge of the Bay until you get to the Ferry Building. As they walked off in the direction I’d suggested, Mom said to her presumed daughter, “See, I fuckin’ told you!” I hoped it wasn’t me who’d failed her.

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A UKIAH READER ASSESSES UKIAH VALLEY’S WATER SITUATION:

It is not so much a question of water wars, but more a lack of ability of the local players to act in concert. Water wars implies two or more interests competing to either advance their strategic vision of water policy, or control the resource, or both. Here the water right is divided among minor players with no vision beyond the narrow boundaries of their individual districts. All change is viewed with suspicion, especially ceding any authority to another agency. Which brings us to the looming failure to decide who shall be in charge of the state requirement for groundwater monitoring, an apparent prerequisite for state grant funding. There is no war, there is no fight, just an inability to cooperate to do the simple things that are needed to serve the public interest. In contrast, Sonoma County, via the SoCo Water Agency, always speaks with one voice, and with the full political and financial support to back it up. That doesn’t mean their view always prevails, but it puts them in the best position to advance their common interest. Here, perpetuating the status quo of the various balkanized water districts has taken precedence over what should be the primary public interest of securing and delivering water to those who rely on it.

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INTERESTING PIECE ON CALIFORNIA’S WATER DELIVERY SYSTEMS by Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic titled “American Aqueduct: The Great California Water Saga.”

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COMMENT OF THE DAY

Kirpal Singh, 21, part of a Sikh regiment of the British Army, joined a sapper unit, headed by Lord Suffolk, which dealt with delayed-action and unexploded bombs, during World War II. The first bomb Singh dismantled was in a giant white chalk horse in Westbury. Miss Morden, Suffolk’s secretary, took notes on how he did it. Life expectancy in the sapper units was low. Singh joined because there was greater chance of choice and life in a war alongside an individual. He passed the exam easily; in his country mathematics and mechanics were natural traits. Suffolk, Morden and Harts (the driver-mechanic) were known as “the holy trinity” because of their uncanny survival of bomb explosions. At Suffolk’s estate, Singh found a map with the words, “Drawn by desire of…” He adored Suffolk; thought he was the best of the English. After Singh had been with them a year, Suffolk, Morden, and Harts, along with 4 sappers, were killed by a bomb Suffolk was trying to dismantle. Singh had to dismantle another to find out what had gone wrong. Suffolk had said a bomb was more than a mechanical object, you had to consider somebody made it. He ripped out the fuse pocket, and found a second detonator inside the first. He had loved Suffolk, and realized that he was expected to replace him. On a large blueprint sheet he put everything he knew about the new bomb, and at the bottom wrote, “Drawn by desire of Lord Suffolk, by his Student Lt. Karpal Singh.” He rejoined the regular Army, but remembered the day of the giant white horse, when Miss Morden climbed up and doused a handkerchief with eau de cologne for him. She had pulled him out of the vortex of the problem.

Drawn By Desire (from the English Patient by Michael Ondaatje)

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THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE: Nebraska and Dallas Buyer’s Club were the two best movies I saw this year, Nebraska especially. 12 Years A Slave, brilliant as it is, is a must-see for people who lack imagination. If you need visual confirmation that slavery was systematized murder, torture, rape, and lesser atrocities too numerous to name, you should probably see this movie. And since young people generally require visuals to get the point across, whatever the point is, 12 Years A Slave should be mandatory viewing in the schools. I haven’t seen The Wolf of Wall Street because I know how these animals spend their looted billions without paying my way in to see going about their vulgar business. It’s long past time for torches and pitchforks in this doomed country, but I hope to live long enough to see the One Percent get it. Amend that, please. Since we’re talking film aesthetics here, what’s doubling galling about today’s mega-rich, and of course there are exceptions but not many, is how savage they truly are. Can you imagine Count Tolstoy being stirred to write up these Silicon Valley magnates? Have you ever seen or heard a single remark from any or all of them that was at all interesting? Madam Dafarge, if you will put down your knitting, we will proceed….

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HELLO THERE, OFFICER LAW!

by Emily Hobelmann

Carrying pot, processing pot, growing pot, consuming pot, buying pot — no matter where you are, can get you into sticky-icky situations with law enforcement. And you know this, man. Maybe you’re a slimeball and you deserve to get rousted by the fuzz. Maybe you’re all peace and rainbows and Gandhi-esque. Either way, we do have rights that we can assert in law enforcement encounters, regardless of the context or of who’s right or wrong or whatever.

Enter the Fired Up Lawyer, Attorney Lauren A. Vazquez. This past November, Vazquez published a very resourceful article in Ladybud Magazine: “How To Assert Your Rights When You Encounter the Police.”

Her opening line: “If you use pot, you are a criminal.” Law enforcement targets criminal activity. As indicated by the title of the article, Vazquez gets into how exactly to assert your rights in law enforcement encounters. She’s all about the “magic words,” four different phrases that are to be used in a particular order in a sticky encounter with law enforcement. (And this applies to any encounter with law enforcement, regardless of whether it has anything to do with marijuana.)

Now, she gets into more detail in her article and you should definitely read it in its entirety, but I’ll summarize the basics of the magic words here. (Disclaimer: The information in this article is provided for informational purposes only and does not contain legal advice, legal opinions or any other form of advice regarding any specific facts or circumstances.)

  1. Am I free to go?” This question clarifies whether or not you are being detained. If you aren’t being detained, you might still have to wait for law enforcement to finish writing you a citation, or whatever. But if you are being detained, then “the police cannot ask you questions without reading you your rights, just like on the TV cop shows,” she writes. If the police detain you and they don’t read you your rights, Vazquez advises in her article that “your lawyer can use this against them in court.”
  2. I do not consent to any searches.” Police can’t search you without having a reason — “like having probable cause or a warrant,” Vazquez advises. And even then, there might be certain parameters around what exactly law enforcement can search. If you do grant law enforcement consent to search, then “you are giving them permission to search everywhere,” she writes. If you drop these magic words and law enforcement still searches, Vazquez advises quietly standing back and letting them search. “Maybe they find something, maybe they don’t.”
  3. I want to remain silent.” In order to remain silent, you have to speak these words. If you declare these magic words, law enforcement may still continue to question you. If you still want to remain silent, then you have to repeat yourself: “I want to remain silent.”
  4. I want a lawyer.” Vazquez advises that, “When you tell the police, ‘I want a lawyer,’ they are not allowed to talk to you again until you have a lawyer with you.” She writes that if you don’t have a lawyer or if you can’t afford one, then you can ask for a “free lawyer” at your first court date.

And if you’re a medical marijuana patient in a law enforcement encounter, Vazquez advises the same course of action — using the magic words. You don’t have to tell the police that you are a patient or where you get your meds. You don’t have to tell them anything. “If and when they find your pot,” she writes, “they should also find your patient paperwork, whether it is a doctor’s letter or a state card.” Obviously you want to use your best judgment in a police encounter. If law enforcement is being cool, then maybe you do want to talk to them. But you don’t have to tell them anything. “Say the magic words, follow police orders, and shut up!” Vazquez says. Again, I suggest you read the article in its entirety. Here’s the link.

http://www.ladybud.com/2013/11/11/surviving-police-encounters-with-pot/

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I got Vazquez on the phone the other day to ask her about a couple of common legal issues in the marijuana realm. Vazquez did not remain silent. First, I asked her what she thinks is the most important thing weed people need to keep in mind when they’re in the midst of a law enforcement encounter (aside from the magic words). Vazquez said: “Don’t argue with the police because they don’t have the final say and it can only get you into more trouble or it can even get you hurt.” Indeed.

We briefly discussed marijuana DUIs. I asked her if someone can get a marijuana DUI for having a weed pipe or some other paraphernalia within arm’s reach in the cab of their car.

Vazquez said that in California, law enforcement has to prove that you were impaired to issue a DUI. “In California,” she said, “the blood test isn’t enough. They have to prove impairment.” She continued, “It would help the police’s case if they could say that you were swerving or you didn’t stop at the stop sign, and that you looked high, your eyes were red, you were talking slow and it also smelled like pot and they saw a pipe. But if it’s just, ‘I saw a pipe and smelled pot,’ it might not be enough for a DUI charge or a blood test.” So it’s kind of that thing again, where law enforcement doesn’t necessarily have the final say. But still, you probably don’t want to argue this point with a police officer on the side of the highway. And what’s more, maybe you don’t want to keep pipes or joints on-hand in the front seat of your vehicle. Just in case.

I also asked her about carrying weed and concentrates. She advised me of the California Medical Marijuana Program, which is the state ID card program for patients and caregivers. The program is voluntary and the cards are valid for one year from the date of issuance. The state charges $66 for the ID card and you can tack on whatever fees your county collects on that as well (you obtain your state ID card through the county).

From this handy chart, I see that 2,303 state medical marijuana ID cards have been issued in “Humbolt” County since 2005. Fascinating. If you are a qualified medical marijuana patient, you can contact the Humboldt County Department of Public Health in Eureka for information on obtaining your card. Their digits are (707) 445-6200.

Vazquez told me that the state ID card is a “get out of jail free card for eight ounces of weed or less.” However, she said that the “state ID card doesn’t say anything about quantities for concentrates. The assumption is that your letter [doctor’s recommendation] or state ID card will cover you for a personal use amount. But this is where the law and reality collide because most police officers don’t know or pretend not to know that hash is protected under Prop 215 and patients can have concentrates of all kinds.” If you don’t have a doctor’s recommendation, carrying concentrates is a felony charge, Vazquez told me. If you do have a doctor’s recommendation, but you are carrying more than a “personal use amount,” that can land you in some trouble. What’s fuzzy here is that what constitutes a “personal use amount” of concentrates for medical marijuana patients isn’t explicitly clear in the state of California.

In a law enforcement encounter, the police make the call on what looks like a personal use amount of concentrates. And if you are arrested for possessing concentrates, then the DA will decide whether to bring charges. If you go to court, then it’s up to the jury to decide whether or not you were carrying a reasonable personal use amount of concentrates. (And you can only carry concentrates if you have a doctor’s recommendation.)

Now if we’re talking in terms of poundage, Vazquez said that “over eight ounces is where it starts to get harder to prove that it’s for personal use.” (Which could be unreasonable in some cases, right? Maybe you need a few pounds a year for yourself.) She went on to say, “If you have more than eight ounces and it’s not personal use, or it is personal use, but that’s not something you can prove, the back-up defense is the collective defense.” But you have to prove that you’re a member of a collective. And Vazquez told me, “If you can’t prove it on the roadside, you can prove it in court.” Again, the disclaimer: The information in this article is provided for informational purposes only and does not contain legal advice, legal opinions or any other form of advice regarding any specific facts or circumstances.

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We didn’t have time to get into much else in the way of marijuana laws and how they play out in police encounters, but what’s most important out of all of this is knowing your rights and being able to state them in a law enforcement encounter. This isn’t to say that you have to state your rights or that you want to state your rights in a law enforcement encounter, but keep them in your back pocket. And as Vazquez advised, the police don’t have the final say.

But sometimes police do have the final say because they just let you go, right? Like that time I got stopped in security at the Santa Rosa Airport with a couple grams of OG Kush. The TSA agent who found my container of cannabis, which was not exactly hidden, called in the local police to deal with me and my marijuana. TSA detained me, and while I waited for Santa Rosa PD to show up, I watched the agent take my jar of weed around to other TSA agents to brag about his bust. Then he took photographs of the small jar of weed with his cell phone.

Maybe the TSA agent was new to NorCal. Maybe he didn’t realize that a couple grams of weed in CA isn’t a big deal. (Yes, I was at the airport, so it could have been a big deal. I didn’t know — I was operating under the misconception that it was cool to fly from SR to LA with my meds and my doctor’s rec). When the local cop showed up, I volunteered my doctor’s recommendation. The cop looked at the jar of weed, and then he said something like this, “Bringing weed to the airport is illegal. This is federal property. But it’s just a couple of nugs and you have your paperwork, so I’m not going to make a big deal out of this.” He took my weed and off I went, minus a couple grams of OG.

Oh yeah, and there was that time I got hassled for smoking a joint in Redwood Park by Ranger someone or other. (I can’t remember his name. Nice guy.) I volunteered my doctor’s recommendation in that encounter too. Yes, the Ranger let me go, but not without a lecture on how all that the moms at the park know is that I’m using drugs, and to them, I may as well be using meth. I did not agree with the points of his lecture, but I did not argue with him. And off I went, minus a joint.

* * *

I’ll close with one more quick thing, and that’s the recent change to the state Health and Safety Code, relating to transporting controlled substances as per AB 721. (Text of the bill here.)

I heard about this change on KMUD News back in January, when local attorney Ed Denson was featured in a series of segments, talking about new laws that we-the-people should be aware of. (There was also a spot of coverage on AB 721 in the LA Times here.)

I asked Denson via email to help me understand the changes to the Health and Safety Code in terms of marijuana. Here’s what he told me: “Drugs fall under the Health and Safety Code. Four sections prohibit transport of one group of controlled substances or another and make it a felony. (HS 11352, 11360 (Marijuana), 11379 and 11379.5 (Phencyclidine — i.e., PCP)). Two of those sections were altered by AB 721 to include ‘For purposes of this section “transports” means transports for sale.’ They were 11352 and 11379.” In other words, if the controlled substances that someone is transporting don’t appear to be intended for sale (meaning they appear to be for personal use), then trafficking charges will not be brought against that person, although, the person can still be charged with possession. Denson clarified that this change to the code does not cover marijuana.

Transporting less than an ounce of marijuana is a misdemeanor. More than an ounce, that’s another story. Read state Health and Safety Code for marijuana here.

Tricky to keep up with all of this stuff, eh?

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CRAIG BREAKS THROUGH!

Let Go and Let God

Following mass today at Church of the Holy Name of Mary in Algiers, LA, I was fortunate to have long conversation with the priest (a Redemptorist). We discussed my need for a vocation fully, and he shared with me this: that as soon as I do battle with the mind, I lose! At this point, my next step is to “Let Go, and Let God,” and not worry that I will somehow be destroyed by refusing to battle the mind for control. Have a peaceful glorious day… Every day. Craig Louis Stehr

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ELK’S 27TH ANNUAL RUMMAGE SALE

The Greenwood Civic Club invites you to take part in the 27th annual Elk Rummage Sale to be held Saturday and Sunday, April 5th and 6th from 10am. to 4pm at the Greenwood Community Center in downtown Elk. Discover antiques, collectibles, clothes, books, toys, housewares, furniture, tools, and more at bargain prices. Join the “ Great Race” Sunday afternoon – all you can stuff in a bag for $2. While shopping, feast on baked goods, drinks and home-made tempting lunch items. Proceeds from the annual event benefit community projects, the summer children’s program and student scholarships. Donations in good condition are welcome before the sale and may be dropped off at the Elk Community Center April 2nd and 3rd between 10am and 3pm. For information or pickup assistance, call Rae at 877-3224 or visit www.elkweb.org. The Greenwood Civic Club is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible. Thank You! If you have any questions, please contact: Patty Wolfe for Greenwood Civic Club seawolfe@mcn.org 707-882-2729

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VOTE FOR PAUL

Letter to the Editor

I, Paul Lambert, former KZYX newsman and host of Mendo Matters, am running for the KZYX Board of Directors as an At Large Candidate. I am making this statement to urge the members to participate in this election. On the web, a group who are deeply frustrated with KZYX’s current direction have stated that, if elected, the General Manager and the Program director will be fired. They already have plans for who they will hire to do the news and have discussed reducing or eliminating NPR programming.  Their attacks on Coate and Aigner caused the Board of Directors to take the unprecedented step of writing a public letter on the KZYX website supporting the staff signed by eight of the nine board members.  I do not believe that these folks represent the majority of the membership.  By no means is KZYX perfect or anywhere near it; it needs better programming, more diverse programming, including younger people, Latinos, African Americans, Gays and children. It needs a studio in Ukiah so other voices can be heard. Some programs that used to be on should be reviewed for inclusion again. There are legitimate issues that should be addressed, like making it easier to communicate with the Board. That’s why your vote is so important in this election. Be sure to vote. Please vote for me, Paul Lambert (At Large) and the Third District Jane Futcher (who has had no part in this letter). You, the membership, will decide and I will abide by your decision. Paul Lambert

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BLOOD FROM A TURNIP:

Redwood Valley convict charged $100,000 in restitution

by Tiffany Revelle

A Redwood Valley man sentenced last month for his part in a high-speed chase and shooting at a deputy sheriff’s car may have to pay his victims more than $100,000 in restitution, most of it to the state for a separate high-speed chase that left a California Highway Patrol officer injured.

Skaggs

Skaggs

Christopher Skaggs, 31, was sentenced to 13 years in prison Jan. 24 in Mendocino County Superior Court for two cases, including a Feb. 25, 2013 incident where he drove a speeding Thunderbird on the winding Highway 253 (known as Boonville Road) while his passenger, Walter K. Miller, leaned out the window and shot at the deputy’s car, disabling it.

He took a plea bargain in December that dropped attempted murder and vicarious arming charges in exchange for his guilty plea to first-degree burglary for breaking into a Potter Valley home earlier the same day and stealing guns — including the one Miller used in the shooting — and other items.

Skaggs also admitted committing the Potter Valley burglary while out on bail in another felony case, a Nov. 14, 2012 incident where he led authorities on a high-speed chase that left a pursuing CHP officer injured.

The deal involved Skaggs pleading guilty in that case to charges of recklessly evading a peace officer causing injury and reckless evasion by driving in the oncoming lane.

The potential $105,374 in restitution for which Skaggs could be responsible includes $8,533.03 owed to the Potter Valley homeowners for the burglary, and $70,860.56 calculated so far that would go to the state compensation insurance fund to reimburse the cost of the injured CHP officer’s medical bills.

Mendocino County District Attorney David Eyster told the court Friday that the amount Skaggs owes the state for restitution in the November 2012 case will likely go up, since the state is still paying the officer’s medical expenses.

Judge John Behnke granted the $8,533.03 restitution amount to the Potter Valley family, but opted to put off ruling on the restitution amount Skaggs will owe the state. Behnke said he would issue his ruling in writing.

(Courtesy, the Ukiah Daily Journal.)

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ON LINE COMMENT OF THE DAY

Listen to the endless idiocy of the right-winger troglodytes (FAUX News). Americans have no possible clue about the rich history of oppression inflicted upon the Ukrainian people. The Russians have historically tried to hijack the Ukrainian future and language. And over what. Only the richest farmland in the region. I only know this because I married into a fine Ukrainian family displaced during the onset of the second world war. Our President is in no position to inflict his will on this centuries old conflict. We, as a country, have been stretched thin militarily going on decades now. We no longer have the economic strength to satisfy the Reagan warmongers and the people have not the will to engage in endless wars. But keep making this horrible situation another reason for partisan Obama criticism. McCain, Palin, Romney or any other president would not handle this with any more success than our current president. This will be played out by the Russian and Ukrainian people with a lot of posturing and tough talk by the rest of the world. It is sad that these people have to endure this again and again.

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STATEMENT OF THE DAY:

Demonstrations the world over are underway not for some nebulous concept of freedom and democracy but rather because mercenary privatization IMF style and messy capitalism are ripping asunder their target societies as prices for water, rent and food skyrocket with no reasonable safety nets established. And when the populace is life-insecure, the nation’s stability is threatened. If it is not the capitalists then it’s the dictators and their minions who seek to fill their bank accounts with cash for the day they are booted out of power. And yet free market and expeditionary economic cheerleaders are the first ones to turn to the State when profits sink which means no one wants to buy what they are selling. Then there is that pesky violent history from the mid-19th to the 20th Century. If the idea of war is to create a better, long lasting peace, as someone once said, are we setting up for a third world war, the trifecta that ends all wars? (John Stanton)

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THE 30TH WHALE RUN AND WALK, sponsored by Soroptimist International of Fort Bragg, is Saturday, March 15, starting off at 8am in front of the Skunk Train Depot, on Laurel Street between the Town Hall and the Depot Mall. Start time for the Kiddie Race is 7:30am. This 10K, 5K Run, 5K Competitive Walk, 5K Fun Walk and Kiddie Race will send runners and walkers north onto Stewart Street from the Skunk Train Depot parking lot, crossing the scenic Pudding Creek Trestle, onto the Haul Road. This is an out and back course. The Awards ceremony will be held near the finish line. Participants have the opportunity of winning one of three medals for each age division in their group: 10K Run, 5K Run, or 5K Competitive Walk. Participants can register for the race online or by mail using the links on the Whale Run website – soroptimistfortbraggca.org or get the link by Googling the words “whale run.” Registration will take place Friday evening (3/14/14, 4 – 7pm) and the morning of the Race (3/15/14, 6:30 – 7:45am) at Fort Bragg Town Hall on the corner of Main Street and Laurel Street. All the proceeds from this event are returned to the community through college scholarships, and awards to women head of households to further their education. The Soroptimists of Fort Bragg are pleased to have this year two Corporate Sponsors: The North Coast Brewing Company and Redwood Investments. Please look at the Whale Run website (Google the words, whale run) to see the many businesses and individuals who are this year’s generous supporting and in-kind donors. This years’ Whale Run Raffle offers night’s stay and dinner at the Little River Inn, a night’s stay at the Atrium Bed & Breakfast and 4 club level Giants tickets (donated by Dr. Robert Bruce). For more information on the Race and the Whale Run Raffle please email whalerun@mcn.org [For further information contact Lynne 964-4913 or whalerun@mcn.org]

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POLICE CALLS AS OF SUNDAY MORNING:

Sheriff’s Reports

The following were compiled from reports prepared by the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office:

DUI — Bret A. Shaffer, 24, of Lakeport, was arrested at 3:38 a.m. Feb. 20 on suspicion of driving under the influence and booked at the county jail. The California Highway Patrol arrested him.

Domestic Violence — Casey A. Ireland, 20, of Willits, was arrested at 8 a.m. Feb. 20 on suspicion of domestic assault and booked at the county jail under $25,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Gabriel L. Mendoza, 36, of Hopland, was arrested at 9:39 a.m. Feb. 20 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit and violating his probation, and booked at the county jail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Carlos Garcia, 26, of Redwood Valley, was arrested at 10:14 p.m. Feb. 20 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail. The CHP arrested him.

DUI — Richard L. Bolton, 63, of Willits, was arrested at 12:23 a.m. Feb. 21 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $5,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

Battery With Injury — Michael D. Hammond, 29, of Fort Bragg, was arrested at 1 a.m. Feb. 21 on suspicion of battery causing serious injury, resisting or threatening an officer and violating his probation terms, and booked at the county jail under $32,500 bail. The Fort Bragg Police Department arrested him.

DUI — Eric A. Rust, 45, of Chico, was arrested at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21 on suspicion of driving under the influence with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit and public intoxication, and booked at the county jail. The Willits Police Department arrested him.

DUI — Terri L. Anderson, 50, of Fair Oaks, was arrested at 10:36 p.m. Feb. 21 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $5,000 bail. The WPD arrested her.

Vehicle Theft — Rafael V. Ramirez, 34, of Gualala, was arrested at 8:40 a.m. Feb. 22 on suspicion of vehicle theft and violating his probation terms, and booked at the county jail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Patrick J. Stanley, 33, of Gilbert, W. Va., was arrested at 5:37 p.m. Feb. 22 on suspicion of driving under the influence and booked at the county jail under $30,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

DUI — Gumersindo Martinez-Mendoza, 40, of Redwood Valley, was arrested at 10:34 p.m. Feb. 22 on suspicion of driving under the influence, driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit and driving without a license, and booked at the county jail under $17,500 bail. The CHP arrested him.

False Imprisonment — James Cervantes Portillo, 20, of Sea Ranch, was arrested at 1:30 a.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of false imprisonment with violence and public intoxication, and booked at the county jail under $20,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

Assault With A Deadly Weapon — Michael A. Dejong, 30, of California, was arrested at 11:55 a.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon, stalking and threatening injury, burglary and trespassing, and booked at the county jail under $50,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

Domestic Violence — Richard K. Johnson, 45, of Hopland, was arrested at 5:45 p.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of domestic assault and violating his probation terms, and booked at the county jail. The MCSO arrested him.

Domestic Violence — Rosanne M. Houser, 28, of Ukiah, was arrested at 8 p.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of domestic assault and booked at the county jail under $25,000 bail. The MCSO arrested her.

DUI — Mark W. Lanfranchi, 49, of Concord, was arrested at 8 p.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $5,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

DUI — Rick J. Mayfield, 61, of Redwood Valley, was arrested at 9:43 p.m. Feb. 23 on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail. The CHP arrested him.

Battery With Injury — Damian M. Underwood, 21, of Ukiah, was arrested at 12:49 a.m. Monday on suspicion of battery causing serious injury and booked at the county jail under $30,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Frederick R. Simmons, 49, of Laytonville, was arrested at 8:17 a.m. Monday on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $5,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

Marijuana Sales — Jose M. Quijada-Orellana, 34, of Fort Bragg, was arrested at 12:28 a.m. Tuesday on suspicion of possessing marijuana for sale, cultivating marijuana and violating his probation terms, and booked at the county jail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Norman T. Bashore, 41, of Willits, was arrested at 4:40 p.m. Tuesday on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $30,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

DUI — Jorge Olea, 21, of Ukiah, was arrested at 8 a.m. Wednesday on suspicion of driving under the influence with prior convictions and booked at the county jail. The CHP arrested him.

DUI — Cody W. Ward, 31, of Gualala, was arrested at 7:43 p.m. Thursday on suspicion of driving under the influence, driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, driving with a suspended license and violating his probation terms, and booked at the county jail. The CHP arrested her.

Domestic Violence — Cheryl A. Turner, 49, of Fort Bragg, was arrested at 2:32 a.m. Friday on suspicion of domestic assault and booked at the county jail under $25,000 bail. The MCSO arrested her.

Domestic Violence — Jason R. Walker, 34, of Fort Bragg, was arrested at 10:53 a.m. Friday on suspicion of domestic assault and booked at the county jail under $25,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Wilfredo R. Blanco, 36, of Fort Bragg, was arrested at 12:43 p.m. Friday on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail under $5,000 bail. The CHP arrested him.

Domestic Violence — Robert D. Allen, 61, of Ukiah, was arrested at 10 p.m. Friday on suspicion of domestic assault and booked at the county jail under $25,000 bail. The MCSO arrested him.

Animal Abuse, Grand Theft — Andrew J. Gitchel, 27, of Albion, was arrested at 10:54 p.m. Friday on suspicion of killing, maiming or abusing animals and grand theft, and booked at the county jail. The MCSO arrested him.

DUI — Morgan A. Reed, 31, of Navarro, was arrested at 11:37 p.m. Friday on suspicion of driving under the influence and driving with a blood-alcohol level greater than the legal limit, and booked at the county jail. The CHP arrested her.

5 Responses to Mendocino County Today: Monday, March 3, 2014

  1. Mark Richie Reply

    March 4, 2014 at 7:49 am

    Yes, Bruce, you’re of course right that most of the dissidents at KZYX are only unhappy because THEY or their friends don’t get the limelight, a program of their ‘own’, etc. Very few care a fig about the original idea, to have a viable ALTERNATIVE to commercial radio..

    NOT a little league or a farm system for those who haven’t ‘made it’ to big time media stardom.

  2. Dickey Weinkle Reply

    March 3, 2014 at 11:44 am

    Please accept Paul Lambert’ s request to vote for him and Jane Futcher.

    When I moved to Menocino County 6 years ago, one of my first attempts to find out about community service was to volunteer answering phones for KZXY-Z for their pledge drive. The guest that hour was Sheriff Allman, with whom I began lasting and productive relationship.

    Unfortunately, my discussions with station brass at the buffet that was provided, ended almost instantaneously with their absolute refusal to discuss the possibility of my producing a show.

    I’ve always encouraged those who want to be productive.

    I’ve found that their intractacibility is the exception for our community.

    Better that they fall on their swords that be kicked to the side of the road.

    We get what we vote for.

  3. Lazarus Reply

    March 3, 2014 at 11:08 am

    Fjords should be demolished…….

  4. Jim Armstrong Reply

    March 3, 2014 at 10:09 am

    Fjord’s an “oasis?”
    Its current condition is a perfect metaphor for its historic food.

  5. Jim Updegraff Reply

    March 3, 2014 at 9:18 am

    The Ukraine situation is a fast moving story, but it is has become clear Crimea and perhaps other Russian speaking areas will also spin off from being part of Ukraine. Obama and the Europeans can huff and puff but there is nothing they can do about it. Ukraine, a fiscal basket case, will move towards being part of the EU.

    Splits and potential splits is also going on in other countries: Catalonia is voting this year for independence from Spain. Also this year Scotland will be voting for independence from the United Kingdom Plus the Syrian Kurds are moving toward an independent state.

    Jim Updegraff

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